Photo Stitching for Panoramic Effects

Posted by batman on Jan 21st, 2009
2009
Jan 21

Photo Stitching is a process whereby several photo’s are taken in sequence, and then using a software package (I have used Canon’s Zoombrowser EX, which came with my Canon 350D) to “stitch”, or join the photo’s together, to form one, wide (or high if you want) photo. These are some examples of what I have achieved.

Photos these days can be quite large – my 350D of 8 megapixels yields photos in the order of 3 Mb minimum. Merging about 5 of these photos can easily result in a stitched photo of 15 Mb. For the purposes of this webpage I have had to reduce the size and quality of these photos quite substantially in order to make it render in a reasonable timeframe. Rest assured – the originals are of a much higher resolution!

Stitching can be used to create a panorama (5 wide x 1 high), but can also be used to create much higher resolution e.g (3 wide x 3 high) with an 8 megapixel camera will result in an image of roughly 8 * 9 = 72 megapixels, for you to do with as you please.

I am by no means an expert, and these were accomplished with minimal hassle – I seriously believe that anyone with a decent camera and software can produce images like these within minutes.

Some tips & tricks:

  • Try to keep a constant line through all of them e.g. the horizon works like a charm
  • Rather have too much overlap, than too little
  • Try to keep all photo’s equi-distant i.e. don’t have your leftmost photo closeby, while your rightmost one is far away – you’ll get undesirable curvature effects
  • You will need consistent lighting across the entire sequence e.g. avoid bright sunshine at one end, and shade at the other end
  • Naturally all of the shots must be taken with identical camera settings i.e. don’t fiddle with your focal distance, apertures or shutter speeds between sequences
  • Unexplained hiccups do occur – see Yzerfontein below
  • Practice makes perfect – the fun is in the trying and experimenting

The Orange River, Namibia

The view from the mine.jpg

St Helena Bay, South Africa

20081130_st_helena_bay.jpg

Yzerfontein, South Africa (almost good)

20081130_yzerfontein.jpg

Bains Kloof, South Africa

20081130_bains_kloof.jpg

Table Mountain, South Africa (taken by renowned photographer Shafiq Bailey, CT) – Canon 1000D

TableMountainView.jpg

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4 Responses

  1. puzz puzz Says:

    Try autostitch, it is a very nice and easy to use stittching app. I also used Canon’s app, but switched first to hugin, then autostitch and AutoPano pro.

    Nice photos, by the way!

  2. batman batman Says:

    i looked at them all a few years ago (on linux tho). they seemed very technical, altho very powerful, but one had to match points on each photo in the overlap zones, and try several times before getting a suitable result.

    this canon tool just works. but yes, i’m sure there’s a lot of ways to skin a cat…

  3. puzz puzz Says:

    Correction 😉 with autostitch there is no need to manually match points…

  4. Photos Mariage Paris Photos Mariage Paris Says:

    I've heard it's good to have the zoom level somewhere in the middle so the pictures don't become too concave/convex??
    <a href="http://www.chg-photographie.com/&quot; rel="dofollow" title="Photos Mariage Paris">Photos Mariage Paris</a>

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